Photo Credit: TBD

Conservation Leadership: Conservation of the Togo Slippery Frog

08.07.2016

Conservation Problem

The Togo Slippery Frog used to be found in a handful of localities in Ghana and Togo, but in recent years its occurrence has been confirmed only in Ghana. Only about 45 individuals are confirmed surviving. Unfortunately, this very small surviving population is facing a possible extinction threat due to human consumption and habitat alteration. The frog is targeted by local communities as a food source because it spends its entire life in streams making it easy to hunt. In addition, the habitat occupied by the frog has been earmarked for mining and in the meantime being rapidly reduced by illegal logging. These threats make the survival of this species unlikely unless urgent conservation actions are taken.

Project Activities

In this SOS - Save Our Species project, implemented through the Conservation Leadership Programme (CLP), a participatory rural education approach to educate and involve communities in species protection was adopted. Visual and acoustic encounter survey techniques were used to collect species data. Results influenced the decision to upgrade the protection status of the study site from Forest Reserve to National Park and development of the first Amphibian Conservation Action Plan for Ghana.

Project Outcomes

The long-term objectives of this project are to increase the specie's population by at least 50% in two years, improve its status to Endangered in five years, and to train and equip 20 young conservationists to protect the species by July 2011.

Furthermore, results will influence the decision to upgrade the protection status of the study site from Forest Reserve to National Park and development of the first Amphibian Conservation Action Plan for Ghana.


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